Browsing: Social

The latest news about social psychology and sociology research

Can you predict your mate will cheat by their voice?

When choosing a partner, women believe the lower the man’s voice, the more likely he’s going to cheat. Conversely, men think a woman with a higher voice is more likely to be unfaithful, researchers have found.

‘Feminine’ science catches girls’ interest

Researchers at the University of Luxembourg found that the reason why girls are less interested in science than boys is that scientific topics are commonly presented in a male context. When scientific concepts in physics, information technology, and statistics were presented in a female friendly way – as for example relating to online shopping or cosmetic surgery – the mean level of girls’ interest rose.

Racial identity tied to happiness

Black people who identify more strongly with their racial identity are generally happier, according to a study led by psychology researchers at Michigan State University.

Trust, clarity and openness in the workplace

In times of uncertainty employers should engage more openly with their staff and drop the jargon to improve communication and allow feedback, according to a paper in this month’s International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management.

Higher job performance linked to people who are more honest and humble

The more honesty and humility an employee may have, the higher their job performance, as rated by the employees’ supervisor. That’s the new finding from a Baylor University study that found the honesty-humility personality trait was a unique predictor of job performance.

Staring contests are automatic: People lock eyes to establish dominance

Imagine that you’re in a bar and you accidentally knock over your neighbor’s beer. He turns around and stares at you, looking for confrontation. Do you buy him a new drink, or do you try to outstare him to make him back off? New research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests that the dominance behavior exhibited by staring someone down can be reflexive.

Analysis shows which people most likely found incompetent to stand trial

People found incompetent to stand trial are more likely to be unemployed, have been previously diagnosed with a psychotic disorder or have had psychiatric hospitalization, according to an analysis of 50 years of research, published by the American Psychological Association.

Stereotypes can deter consumer purchases

The perception of negative stereotyping, particularly in the areas of financial services and automobile sales and service, can cause consumers to fear being duped and forgo their purchases, according to new research by University of Minnesota associate professor Kathleen D. Vohs.

Females threatened by social exclusion will reject others first

Many studies have suggested that males tend to be more physically and verbally aggressive than females. According to a new study, to be published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, it may not be the case that women are less competitive than men—they may just be using a different strategy to come out ahead. Specifically, women may rely more on indirect forms of aggression, such as social exclusion.

Why innocent suspects may confess to a crime

Why would anyone falsely confess to a crime they didn’t commit? It seems illogical, but according to The Innocence Project, there have been 266 post-conviction DNA exonerations since 1989 — 25 percent of which involved a false confession.

One in three have tried dating websites with middle-aged suitors using them most

In Oxford University study suggests that nearly one in three of us who use the internet have visited online dating sites. An international survey of 24,000 men and women who are presently online found that just six per cent had gone to dating websites in 1997 but by 2009, 30 per cent of the sample had tried them with 15 per cent finding their current partner that way.

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