Browsing: Social

The latest news about social psychology and sociology research

Divisive primaries help challengers and hurt incumbents

Divisive primaries may waste precious campaign resources and damage the primary winner’s reputation and chances to win the general election, according to a study in the current American Politics Research (published by SAGE). The timing of the primary in proximity to the general election can also play a role in the results.

Tendency to cooperate effectively is linked to the number of women in a group

When it comes to intelligence, the whole can indeed be greater than the sum of its parts. A new study co-authored by MIT, Carnegie Mellon University, and Union College researchers documents the existence of collective intelligence among groups of people who cooperate well, showing that such intelligence extends beyond the cognitive abilities of the groups’ individual members.

Perception of emotion is culture-specific

Want to know how a Japanese person is feeling? Pay attention to the tone of his voice, not his face. That’s what other Japanese people would do, anyway. A new study examines how Dutch and Japanese people assess others’ emotions and finds that Dutch people pay attention to the facial expression more than Japanese people do.

Children and adults see the world differently

Unlike adults, children are able to keep information from their senses separate and may therefore perceive the visual world differently, according to research published today.

Inflicting greater harm judged to be less harmful

Joseph Stalin once claimed that a single death was a tragedy, but a million deaths was a statistic. New research from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University validates this sentiment, confirming large-scale tragedies don’t connect with people emotionally in the same way smaller tragedies do.

Text messages reveal the emotional timeline of September 11, 2001

For a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, researchers analyzed text messages sent on September 11, 2001 for emotional words. They found spiking anxiety and steadily increasing anger through that fateful day.

Why Americans believe Obama is a Muslim

There’s something beyond plain old ignorance that motivates Americans to believe President Obama is a Muslim, according to a first-of-its-kind study of smear campaigns led by a Michigan State University psychologist.

Our best and worst moments occur within social relationships

In the first study of its kind, researchers have found compelling evidence that our best and worst experiences in life are likely to involve not individual accomplishments, but interaction with other people and the fulfillment of an urge for social connection.

Core values unite Americans, despite divisions

Americans are united when it comes to many core values, according to a University of Michigan survey. But the nation is deeply divided about certain issues, including gay marriage, immigration, and universal healthcare.

Natural selection alone can explain eusociality

Scientists at Harvard University have sketched a new map of the evolutionary labyrinth species must traverse to reach eusociality, the rare but spectacularly successful social structure where individuals cooperate to raise offspring.