Browsing: Political

The latest news about political psychology research

Right to remain silent not understood by many suspects

Movies and TV shows often depict crime with a police officer handcuffing a suspect and warning him that he has the right to remain silent. While those warnings may appear clear-cut, almost 1 million criminal cases may be compromised each year in the United States because suspects don’t understand their constitutional rights, according to research presented at the 119th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.

Endorsements matter but voters are wise to media bias

Newspaper endorsements for presidential candidates can influence voting decisions, according to newly published research co-authored by Brown University economist Brian Knight. The paper, co-authored by Chun Fang Chiang, demonstrates that voters are more likely to support the recommended candidate following a newspaper’s endorsement, but any degree of influence depends on the credibility of the paper’s pick. The findings are published in The Review of Economic Studies.

Women who leave the workplace: Opting out or overlooking discrimination?

Research from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University helps to explain why many Americans fail to see these persistent gender barriers. The research demonstrates that the common American assumption that behavior is a product of personal choice fosters the belief that opportunities are equal and that gender barriers no longer exist in today’s workplace.

Chance favors the concentration of wealth

Most of our society’s wealth is invested in businesses or other ventures that may or may not pan out. Thus, chance plays a role in where the wealth of a society will end up.

Leadership still considered a masculine trait

So much has changed since 1963, when Betty Friedan’s influential The Feminine Mystique provoked a national discussion about the deep dissatisfaction women were feeling about the limitations of their lives. Many women came to believe that discrimination limited their opportunities, especially in relation to leadership roles.

Voting in elections causes increase in stress hormone cortisol

Voting in elections is stressful, even to a point that it causes hormonal changes among voters. A new study, conducted by scholars from the University of Haifa and Ben-Gurion University in Israel, has found that the level of cortisol — a hormone released when a person is under pressure and helps the body cope with threats — in individuals immediately prior to casting a vote was significantly higher than in the same individuals in similar non-voting conditions.

Income disparity makes people unhappy

Many economists and sociologists have warned of the social dangers of a wide gap between the richest and everyone else. Now, a new study, which will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, adds a psychological reason to narrow the disparity – it makes people unhappy.

Voters have up to five times more influence in early primaries

Voters in states with early primary races such as Iowa and New Hampshire have up to five times the influence of voters in later states in selecting presidential candidates, according to research by Brown University economist Brian Knight. The paper, the first to quantify the effects of early victories in the race for the presidential nomination, is co-authored by Nathan Schiff and published in The Journal of Political Economy.

Daily acts of sexism go unnoticed by men and women

Nearly everyone can recognize the stereotypical scene of construction workers catcalling women as being sexist, but both men and women tend to overlook the more subtle daily acts of sexism they encounter, according to a recent study from Psychology of Women Quarterly.

1 52 53 54 55 56 58