Browsing: Political

The latest news about political psychology research

Racial identity tied to happiness

Black people who identify more strongly with their racial identity are generally happier, according to a study led by psychology researchers at Michigan State University.

Analysis shows which people most likely found incompetent to stand trial

People found incompetent to stand trial are more likely to be unemployed, have been previously diagnosed with a psychotic disorder or have had psychiatric hospitalization, according to an analysis of 50 years of research, published by the American Psychological Association.

Why innocent suspects may confess to a crime

Why would anyone falsely confess to a crime they didn’t commit? It seems illogical, but according to The Innocence Project, there have been 266 post-conviction DNA exonerations since 1989 — 25 percent of which involved a false confession.

Female topics encourage girls to study science

Girls are more interested in studying science if topics are presented in a female friendly way. This is one of the findings of Dr Sylvie Kerger the University of Luxembourg whose research is published online the British Journal of Educational Psychology by BPS Journals in partnership with Wiley-Blackwell.

How do women fend off domestic violence?

For many women in violent relationships, leaving is not an option. Yet a woman’s arsenal of defenses for resisting violence critically depends on her position within the family and community, according to new research from Concordia University published in the journal Review of Radical Political Economics.

Personal well-being linked to national satisfaction

The country where you live can have a big impact on your life. A new study of people from 128 countries finds that the more satisfied people are with their country, the better they feel about their lives—especially people who have low incomes or live in relatively poor countries.

Contact with the criminal justice system associated with suicide risk

Men and women who have had contact with the criminal justice system—even if they have never received a jail or prison sentence or a guilty verdict—appear to have a significantly higher rate of suicide than the general population, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the June print issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Physical activity linked to political participation

How is going for a jog like voting for president? As far as our brains are concerned, physical activity and political activity are two sides of the same coin. Scientists found that people who live in more active states are also more likely to vote.

Racial stereotyping found in US death certificates

Death by homicide, the victim is probably black. By cirrhosis, the decedent is likely Native American. These stereotypes have small but clear effects on the racial classifications used to calculate official vital statistics, according to a new study by sociologists at the University of Oregon and University of California, Irvine.

Eyewitnesses are not as reliable as one might believe

Those who have witnessed a crime would do best not to tell anyone about it. Contrary to what one might believe, a person’s memory of an event is not improved by retelling the story. Instead, the risk of an incorrect account increases the more the story is retold and discussed.

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