Challenging the limits of learning

Although we’re convinced that baby is brilliant when she mutters her first words, cognitive scientists have been conducting a decades-long debate about whether or not human beings actually learn language.

Macho women face backlash at work

Working women who demonstrate stereotypical male behaviours should try to be mindful of their conduct or they are likely to face set-backs because they don’t fit the female stereotype.

Writing by hand strengthens the learning process

When writing by hand, our brain receives feedback from our motor actions, together with the sensation of touching a pencil and paper. These kinds of feedback is significantly different from those we receive when touching and typing on a keyboard.

Students more likely to retake the SAT if their score ends with ’90’

High school students are more likely to retake the SAT if they score just below a round number, such as 1290, than if they score just above it. That’s the conclusion of a study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, which found that round numbers are strong motivators.

A second language gives toddlers an edge

Toddlers who learn a second language from infancy have an edge over their unilingual peers, according to a new study from Concordia University and York University in Canada and the Université de Provence in France.

Big city life may make residents lean toward green

The downsides of China’s explosive urbanization – like pollution and greenhouse gas emissions – now are joined by an upside: Better environmental citizens.

Youth adapt faster than seniors to unexpected events

A new study from Concordia University shows that when a routine task is interrupted by an unexpected event, younger adults are faster at responding. Published in the Journal of Gerontology, the findings have implications for educators and for older adults in situations where performance is crucial.

Distance may be key in successful negotiations

Adding physical distance between people during negotiations may lead to more mutually beneficial outcomes, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin.