Prenatal exposure to pesticides linked to attention problems

Children who were exposed to organophosphate pesticides while still in their mother’s womb were more likely to develop attention disorders years later, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.

Researchers uncover early step in the cascade of brain events leading up to addiction

A regulatory protein best known for its role in a rare genetic brain disorder also may play a critical role in cocaine addiction, according to a recent study in rats, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a component of the National Institutes of Health. The study was published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Culture matters in suicidal behavior patterns and prevention

Women and girls in the United States consider and engage in suicidal behavior more often than men and boys, but die of suicide at lower rate-a gender paradox enabled by U.S. cultural norms of gender and suicidal behavior, according to a psychologist who spoke Thursday at the 118th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association.

Gender harassment just as distressing as unwanted sexual advances

Gender harassment – verbal and nonverbal behaviors that convey insulting, hostile and degrading attitudes to women – is just as distressing for women victims as sexual advances in the workplace. According to Emily Leskinen, Lilia Cortina, and Dana Kabat from the University of Michigan in the US, gender harassment leads to negative personal and professional outcomes too and, as such, is a serious form of sex discrimination.

Cross-cultural perspective can help teamwork in the workplace

In this era of globalization, many companies are expanding into numerous countries and cultures. But they should not take a one size fits all approach to their business and management styles. As the authors of a new article in a special section on Culture and Psychology in Perspectives on Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, point out, people in different cultures think about work in different ways. Being aware of the cultural environment that their coworkers come from may help people work together better.

Study Shows How Memory is Disrupted in Those with Disease Linked to Learning Disabilities

Imagine if your brain lost its working memory — the ability to hold and manipulate information in your mind’s eye. That’s the plight faced by millions of people with neurofibromatosis type 1, or NF1. The genetic condition affects one in 3,500 people and is the most common cause of learning disabilities.

Former Bush Voters Could Determine Outcome of 2012 Presidential Elections

President Obama’s campaign brought millions of new voters to polls during the 2008 elections, but the decisions of former Bush voters had a substantial effect on the outcome. A new University of Michigan analysis indicates that several million formerly Republican voters chose not to support party nominee John McCain, either staying home during the elections or opting for Barack Obama.

A Person’s Language May Influence How He Thinks About Other People

The language a person speaks may influence their thoughts, according to a new study on Israeli Arabs who speak both Arabic and Hebrew fluently. The study found that Israeli Arabs’ positive associations with their own people are weaker when they are tested in Hebrew than when they are tested in Arabic.

Meditation Helps Increase Attention Span

It’s nearly impossible to pay attention to one thing for a long time. A new study looks at whether Buddhist meditation can improve a person’s ability to be attentive and finds that meditation training helps people do better at focusing for a long time on a task that requires them to distinguish small differences between things they see.