Browsing: Psychopharmacology

The latest news about psychopharmacology and drug research

Neuroscientists boost memory using genetics and new drug

When the activity of a molecule that is normally elevated during viral infections is inhibited in the brain, mice learn and remember better, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine reported in a recent article in the journal Cell.

Drug reverses aging-associated changes in brain cells

Drugs that affect the levels of an important brain protein involved in learning and memory reverse cellular changes in the brain seen during aging, according to an animal study in the December 7 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The findings could one day aid in the development of new drugs that enhance cognitive function in older adults.

A more ethical way to compare epilepsy treatments

For the first time, a new research methodology recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration has been used to demonstrate that converting patients from one anti-epileptic drug to another – in this case, lamotrigine extended-release (LTG XR) – is well-tolerated, effective and safe.

Vascular risk linked to long-term antiepileptic drug therapy

New research reveals that patients with epilepsy who were treated for extended periods with older generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may be at increased risk for developing atherosclerosis, a common disorder known as hardening of the arteries.

Scientists discover how to design drugs that could target particular nerve cells

The future of drug design lies in developing therapies that can target specific cellular processes without causing adverse reactions in other areas of the nervous system. Scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Liègein Belgium have discovered how to design drugs to target specific areas of the brain.

Alcohol-related behavior changes: Blame your immune system

When you think about your immune system, you probably think about it fighting off a cold. But new research from the University of Adelaide suggests that immune cells in your brain may contribute to how you respond to alcohol.

Study finds increase of children accidentally poisoned with pharmaceuticals

Pharmaceutical poisoning remains a common childhood injury, despite years of concerted prevention efforts, such as improved safe guards on packaging. Over half a million children are exposed to pharmaceuticals each year. A new study soon to be published in The Journal of Pediatricsattempts to understand this growing problem to aid in the progress of reducing the number of childhood injuries due to pharmaceutical poisoning.

Alcohol dulls brain ‘alarm’ that monitors mistakes

Most people have witnessed otherwise intelligent people doing embarrassing or stupid things when they are intoxicated, but what specifically happens in the brain to cause such drunken actions? A new study testing alcohol’s effects on brain activity from the University of Missouri says that alcohol dulls the brain “signal” that warns people when they are making a mistake, ultimately reducing self control.