Quantcast

Browsing: Social

The latest news about social psychology and sociology research

Popular kids – but not the most popular – more likely to torment peers

While experts often view aggressive behavior as a maladjusted reaction typical of social outcasts, a new study in the February issue of the American Sociological Review finds that it’s actually popular adolescents—but not the most popular ones—who are particularly likely to torment their peers.

Contact with the criminal justice system associated with suicide risk

Men and women who have had contact with the criminal justice system—even if they have never received a jail or prison sentence or a guilty verdict—appear to have a significantly higher rate of suicide than the general population, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the June print issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Importance of managers overestimated

Stop wasting money on expensive training courses for managers. Send the entire team instead! This produces better results, says Johan Bertlett, who recently defended a PhD thesis in psychology at Lund University, Sweden.

Not all movie watching experiences are created equal

When you sit down to watch a new flick, whether you enjoy the movie may depend on the person sitting next to you, according to research from a Kansas State University professor. It’s especially true if you are awkwardly watching a movie’s steamy love scene with your parents.

Go green, give a boost to employee morale

In a global recession, most people are thankful to have a job, but a new study published in Interdisciplinary Environmental Review suggests that employees are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs if they are working for a company that is perceived to be “green”, whereas the financial performance of companies fails to correlate with employee happiness.

Physical activity linked to political participation

How is going for a jog like voting for president? As far as our brains are concerned, physical activity and political activity are two sides of the same coin. Scientists found that people who live in more active states are also more likely to vote.

Infants ascribe social dominance to larger individuals

Psychologists at Harvard University have found that infants less than one year old understand social dominance and use relative size to predict who will prevail when two individuals’ goals conflict. The finding is presented this week in the journal Science.

Racial stereotyping found in US death certificates

Death by homicide, the victim is probably black. By cirrhosis, the decedent is likely Native American. These stereotypes have small but clear effects on the racial classifications used to calculate official vital statistics, according to a new study by sociologists at the University of Oregon and University of California, Irvine.

Megalomaniac CEOs: Good or bad for company performance?

According to a new study, dominant CEOS, who are powerful figures in the organization as compared to other members of the top management team, drive companies to extremes of performance. Unfortunately for shareholders, the performance of a company with an all powerful CEO can be either much worse than other companies, or much better.

Eyewitnesses are not as reliable as one might believe

Those who have witnessed a crime would do best not to tell anyone about it. Contrary to what one might believe, a person’s memory of an event is not improved by retelling the story. Instead, the risk of an incorrect account increases the more the story is retold and discussed.

The ways couples talk can predict relationship success

We know that people tend to be attracted to, date, and marry other people who resemble themselves in terms of personality, values, and physical appearance. However, these features only skim the surface of what makes a relationship work. The ways that people talk are also important. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds that people who speak in similar styles are more compatible.

Freedom’s just another word for employee satisfaction

Workers who feel they have autonomy – that they are free to make choices in the workplace and be accountable for them – are happier and more productive according to an extensive research literature review. Yet there’s no universal cross-cultural definition of autonomy.

Macho women face backlash at work

Working women who demonstrate stereotypical male behaviours should try to be mindful of their conduct or they are likely to face set-backs because they don’t fit the female stereotype.

1 326 327 328 329 330 334